Tuesday, 27 May 2008

Throne and Altar

The Assembly of Quebec has voted unanimously to keep the Crucifix that hangs above the Speaker's Chair and below the Royal Coat of Arms.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Fair enough.

Anonymous said...

Alleluia!
Alleluia!
Alleluia!
Alleluia!

Anonymous said...

I thought I might have put in one too many Alleluias to be plausible. Looks like I got away with it.

David Lindsay said...

You certainly did, although we'll probably get somone saying that there should never be four.

Wallonia and Quebec are the last bastions of the real old France, the latter even complete with the fleur-do-lils on its flag.

Quebec is of course an integral part of the exemplary social democracy that is Her Majesty's Dominion of Canada, and Wallonia of that which is the Kingdom of Belgium, historically our closest ally and trading partner on the Continent, and also headed by a monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha.

old labour old catholic said...

It is notable that "Domine, salvam fac" is used after Sung Masses in the Old Rite in England, just as it was before Vatican II, even though it is otherwise only used in countries with Catholic monarchs.

People familiar with the Byrd setting should consider that Byrd's "reginam nostram Elisabeth" was very definitely not a Catholic.

David Lindsay said...

I'm told that a Lefebvrist priest once tried to introduce it in Scotland. It went down a dream in Edinburgh, but the following Sunday in Glasgow the congregation walked out.

The Old Rite lot, at least, should use it throughout the Queen's Realms and Territories. It would mark out traditional Catholics as pretty much the only people who did routinely pray for the Queen, since next to nobody in the Church of England still says the State Prayers morning and evening.